You can find on this page the USA trains map to print and to download in PDF. The USA railways map presents the rail network and shows high speed rails routes of USA in Americas.
USA Trains started as Charles Ro Trains back in 1988 with a few box cars manufactured in the US and when they introduced their first locomotives in 1995 as its shown in USA train map.

USA rail map

Map of USA train lines

The USA rail map shows all the railway stations and lines of USA trains. This train map of USA will allow you to easily travel by train in showing the major rail routes and high speed rail routes of USA in Americas. The USA rail map is downloadable in PDF, printable and free.

Most rail transport in the USA is based in freight train shipments. The USA rail industry has experienced repeated convulsions due to changing USA economic needs and the rise of automobile, bus, and air transport. Despite the difficulties, USA railroads carried 427 billion ton-miles of cargo annually in 1930. This increased to 750 billion ton-miles by 1975 and doubled to 1.5 trillion ton-miles in 2005 as its mentioned in USA rail map. In the 1950s, the USA and Europe moved roughly the same percentage of freight by rail; but, by 2000, the share of USA rail freight was 38% while in Europe only 8% of freight traveled by rail.

Commuter rail systems in USA exist in more than a dozen metropolitan areas, and commuter systems have been proposed in approximately two dozen other cities, but these systems are not extensively interconnected. The most notable exception to this general rule is New York City as you can see in USA rail map, with its extensive subway system, the Long Island Rail Road, the Metro-North rail extending into Connecticut, and links through the New Jersey Transit system to the Philadelphia-based Southeastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority trains to points as far south as Newark, Delaware.

There are four different types of freight railroads in USA as its shown in USA rail map: Class I, regional, local line haul, and switching & terminal. Class I railroads are defined as those with revenue of at least $346.8 million in 2006. They comprise just one percent of freight railroads, but account for 67 percent of the industry’s mileage, 90 percent of its employees, and 93 percent of its freight revenue. A regional railroad is a line haul railroad with at least 350 miles and/or revenue between $40 million and the Class I threshold. There were 33 regional railroads in 2006. Most have between 75 and 500 employees. Local line haul railroads operate less than 350 miles and earn less than $40 million per year (most earn less than $5 million per year).